Gallery North Fine Art

Artists

Gabor Nemeth

Gallery North is pleased to announce the current display of internationally renowned artist Gabor Nemeth, whose art work will be for sale in the Gallery. We feel privileged to have been chosen to display his work.
Gabor Nemeth survived hardships and atrocities during World War II and the Soviet Occupation of Hungary; yet he was a great dreamer with immense drive and energy.

In 1956 he came to America as a refugee from the Hungarian Soviet Occupation; his only possessions: a small satchel containing a book of poems, a loaf of bread and a change of clothes-no money. He began selling portraits to the military guards and employees at the refugee camp of their girlfriends and wives. He was later hired by the Red Cross to design and paint billboards and flyers.

Once free from the refugee camp, he and his wife Edith started a silk screening business.
In the 1960’s he moved to Los Angeles, CA and began to work for museums in the USA and in Europe. He was also hired by a well to do Beverly Hills art collector as an expert art restorer to help in restoration and conservation.

In 1970, Gabor and his family purchased land in the Two Inlets area to escape the hustle and bustle of Los Angeles. He was able to broker a rare collection of “Old Masters” including the works of students of Bosch, Rubens, Rembrandt, Titian and other representatives of the 16th-17th centuries, for the local Park Rapids museum. In 2011 the North Country Museum of Arts was renamed after Gabor and his wife and is now known as the Nemeth Art Center, NAC.

Gabor painted at least a thousand paintings in the last 23 years. He accomplished much in his life, and in the world of art. He never retired; it was not in his nature. His many interests included opera and French and Hungarian poets.

Although admitting in his last years that he should have remained a bachelor artist, for his fierce nature didn’t lend itself to being much of a family man, he did have deep concern for his family; but his wounds from the Second World War and from the Revolution ran deep, and his secrets passed along with him.
Many expressions could describe Gabor: he was a force to be reckoned with, he was one of a kind, he was larger than life, etc., etc. He seized his days with passion and he shall be missed.
(Information is taken from The Park Rapids Enterprise)